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Upload 3D files for an instant quote. More than 30 kinds of materials are listed online, and from one piece prototype to mass production.
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Our online CNC machining services
CNC Machining Materials
Aluminum
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin),Anodized, Brushed, Spray painting, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Aluminum 6061,Aluminum 7075,Aluminum 5052,Aluminum 2A12
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Stainless steel
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin),Black oxide, Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Stainless steel 304,Stainless steel 316/316L,Stainless steel 303,Stainless steel 430,Stainless steel 201
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Brass
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin),Black oxide, Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Brass C360
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Copper
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin),Black oxide, Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Copper
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Titanium
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Titanium Gr5 (TC4)
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Mild steel
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin),Black oxide, Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Mild steel 1018,Mild steel 1045,Mild steel A36
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Alloy steel
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin),Black oxide, Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Alloy steel 4140,Alloy steel 4340,Alloy steel 1215
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Tool steel
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin),Black oxide, Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Tool steel D2,Tool steel A2,Tool steel O1,Tool steel A3,Tool steel S7,Tool steel H13
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Spring steel
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin),Black oxide, Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Spring steel
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ABS
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
ABS,ABS Flame Retardant,ABS Transparent
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Polycarbonate (PC)
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Polycarbonate (PC)
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Nylon
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Nylon 6,Nylon 12
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Polypropylene (PP)
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Polypropylene (PP)
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POM
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
POM
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PTFE (Teflon)
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Teflon
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PMMA (Acrylic)
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
PMMA
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Polyethylene (PE)
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
Polyethylene (PE)
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PEEK
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Brushed, Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat ...
Type:
PEEK
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Bakelite
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat, Detail sanding ...
Type:
Bakelite
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FR4
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat, Detail sanding ...
Type:
FR4
Learn more
Rubber
Mill Lead Time:
3-5 Business Days
Finishing Options:
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin), Bead Blast, Spray-Plating, Powder Coat, Detail sanding ...
Type:
Rubber
Learn more
Physical and mechanical properties are not guaranteed. They are intended only as a basis for comparison and not for design purposes.
Choose from a broad range of surface finishes
Image Name (10) Applicable Materials Colors Description
Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin) Standard (As-Milled) (Ra 125μin) Metals, Plastics
Applicable to all pantone colors
The finish option with the quickest turnaround. Visible tool marks, potentially sharp edges and burrs would be removed by default.
Bead blast + Anodized color Bead blast + Anodized color Metals
Anodizing creates a corrosion-resistant finish. Parts can be anodized in different colors—clear, black, red, and gold are most common—and is usually associated with aluminum.
Anodized Anodized Metals, Plastics
It creates a corrosion-resistant finish. Parts can be anodized in different colors—clear, black, red, and gold are most common—and is usually associated with aluminum.
Electrically conductive oxidation Electrically conductive oxidation Metals
Applicable to all pantone colors
It creates a corrosion-resistant finish, the film produced by conductive oxidation is only 0.01-0.15 micrometers,
Black oxide Black oxide Stainless steel, steel
Applicable to all pantone colors
Black oxide is a conversion coating used to improve corrosion resistance and minimize light reflection.
Brushed Brushed Metals
Applicable to all pantone colors
Brushing is a surface treatment process in which abrasive belts are used to draw traces on the surface of a material, usually for aesthetic purposes.
Bead Blast Bead Blast Metals, Plastics
Applicable to all pantone colors
The part surface is left with a smooth, matte appearance.
Spray painting - Matt paint Spray painting - Matt paint Aluminum, Titanium, Plastics
Applicable to all pantone colors-Matt
Spray painting: Using spray guns with air pressure to disperse into uniform and fine droplets and apply the painting to the surface of the object.
Spray painting - High gloss paint Spray painting - High gloss paint Aluminum, Titanium, Plastics
Applicable to all pantone colors-High gloss
Spray painting: Using spray guns with air pressure to disperse into uniform and fine droplets and apply the painting to the surface of the object.
Powder coat - Matt Powder coat - Matt Metals
Applicable to all pantone colors-Matt
This is a process where powdered paint is sprayed onto a part that is then baked in an oven.
CNC Machining Tolerances
The tolerances listed here are ideal minimums. Depending on process, material selection, or part geometry, looser tolerances may be required. We follow the ISO 2768/GB/T1804 CNC machining standard.
Limits for nominal size Plastics Coarse class (c) Metals Medium class (m)
0.5mm* to 3mm ±0.2mm ±0.1mm
3mm to 6mm ±0.3mm ±0.1mm
6mm to 30mm ±0.5mm ±0.2mm
30mm to 120mm ±0.8mm ±0.3mm
120mm to 400mm ±1.2mm ±0.5mm
400mm to 1000mm ±2.0mm ±0.8mm
Size limitations for CNC machining
Item Part size / dimension
Maximal part size 2000 mm (80in)
Minimal part size 2 mm (0.08 in)
Minimal diameter 0.3 mm (0.01 in)
How we ensure high quality machined parts
Standard
Critical dimensions
Quantity of parts
Removal of sharp edges and burrs
Number of parts inspected
Surface finish
Threads and tolerances
On request
Full dimensional inspection report
Material/mill test report
ISO9001, ISO14001, ISO27001 and IATF 16949 certifications
First article inspection for orders of 100+ units
Certificate of Conformance
REACH
Material Test Reports
Material Certificates
RoHS
TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW
What is CNC Machining
What is CNC Machining?
CNC stands for computer numerical control. CNC machine tools are programmed and controlled by CNC machining language, usually G code. The CNC machining G code language tells the CNC machine tool which Cartesian position coordinates to use, and controls the tool feed speed and spindle speed, as well as tool changer, coolant and other functions. The most common CNC machining methods in a typical machine shop are CNC milling, CNC turning and CNC EDM wire cutting (wire electric discharge cutting).
Types of CNC Machining
Depending on the type of part that needs to be machined, there are different types of CNC machines that are best suited for the job. CNC milling uses a CNC milling machine, which consists of a multi-axis system (three, four, or five axes, depending on the complexity of the part). CNC turning involves a lathe, which usually has 2 axes and cuts a part using a circular motion. An electrical discharge machine (EDM) uses electrical discharges to shape a workpiece into the desired shape. Hobbing is another machining process used to cut gears, splines and sprockets. Other CNC machine types include plasma cutters and waterjet cutters.
CNC vs 3D Printing
Compared with parts manufacturing through additive methods, CNC machined parts are functionally stronger and typically have superior production quality and finish. Thus, CNC machining is typically used in the mid to late stages of development when parts are ready to be tested for functional accuracy.
CNC Design Considerations
1. Corner radius
Since most drill bits are designed to be cylindrical, this means that any internal cuts you make will also create curved corners, also known as fillets, and the resulting corners will be half the diameter of the tool being used. "Bigger is better" is a good rule when designing parts with internal fillets. The precise measurement of the interior angle will correlate to the machined cavity depth. When inserting inside corners and edges, the radius should be greater than 1/3 of the cavity depth.

2. Right angle undercut
To create right angles in a CNC machined part, to avoid extra cost it is better to add undercuts to the design rather than trying to reduce the corner radius to achieve a similar effect. The maximum depth achievable with undercutting tools is twice the width of the tool head.

3. Fillet
Cavity/recess depth is usually related to the diameter of the tool used to make the internal fillets. Generally, the depth of the groove should be 3-4 times the diameter of the tool. The width of the cavity should also be considered when processing the cavity. Generally, the maximum depth is 4 times the width.

4. Height
As with the depth of cavities and pockets, the maximum height of a part can be up to 4 times the width. The higher the height, the easier it is to vibrate, which reduces the machining accuracy of the part.

5. Avoid thin walls
As with height, wall thickness also affects vibration, with thinner walls more likely to induce vibration. Therefore, the wall thickness of the part is best designed to be thicker. Generally speaking, between 1.0 and 1.5 mm is a suitable minimum thickness for plastic parts, and the minimum wall thickness in metal parts may be between 0.5 mm and 0.8 mm. If the structure is braced or tall, the wall thickness should be thicker to avoid vibration and chatter.

6. Punching standard
There are two types of CNC milling, blind holes and through holes. Whichever you choose, the recommended depth and diameter are the same. Hole diameters should correlate to standard drill sizes of 25.5 mm (over 1 mm diameter) and above. The maximum hole depth depends on the nominal diameter of the hole, usually a hole depth equal to 10 times the nominal diameter of the hole is created.

7. Thread standard
The larger the thread, the easier it is to machine. The length should be kept at most 3 times the nominal diameter of the hole. Off-the-shelf thread sizes can be used to keep costs in check.
FAQ's
What is CNC machining?

CNC machining is a modern manufacturing technique that utilizes programmable software and computer-controlled equipment to create complex parts and products from a wide range of materials such as metal, plastics, and wood.

With CNC (Computer Numerical Control) technology, the manufacturing process is highly automated and precise. The process begins with a CAD (Computer-Aided Design) file, which is converted into a set of instructions in the form of G-code. This code is then sent to a CNC machine, which follows step-by-step instructions to produce the desired part or product.

CNC machining has revolutionized the manufacturing industry by increasing productivity, improving accuracy, reducing waste, and allowing for complex shapes and designs to be produced with high precision. It is used in a variety of industries, including aerospace, automotive, electronics, and medical devices.


What are the benefits of using CNC machines?

The benefits of using CNC machines are:

1. Enhanced precision: CNC machines can produce highly precise and accurate parts with tolerances as low as 0.0002 inches, which is not possible manually.

2. Increased speed: CNC machines are automated and can run 24/7, thereby offering faster production time for large volumes of parts.

3. Consistency: Unlike manual production, CNC machines produce parts that are identical in terms of size, shape, and quality consistently.

4. Reduced labor costs: CNC machines require less manual labor and supervision, which saves labor costs and improves overall efficiency.

5. Flexibility: CNC machines can be reprogrammed easily to create different parts without the need for complex tool changes.

6. Ability to work with a wide range of materials: CNC machines can work with a variety of materials, including metals, plastics, wood, and composites.

7. Improved safety: CNC machines can run automatically, which reduces the risk of injury for workers and provides a safer work environment.

8. Reduced waste: The precision offered by CNC machines reduces the material waste and scraps generated during the production process.


What types of materials can be used with CNC machines?

CNC machines can work with a wide range of materials including metals, plastics, wood, composites, ceramics and more. The types of materials that CNC machines can work with depend on the specific capabilities of the machine, the tooling options available, and the type of work being performed. Here are some examples of materials that can be used with CNC machines:

1. Metals: CNC machines can work with a variety of metals, including steel, aluminum, brass, titanium, copper, and more.

2. Plastics: CNC machines can work with various types of plastics such as polycarbonate, acrylic, nylon, ABS, PVC, and more.

3. Wood: CNC machines also perform operations on hardwood, softwood, plywood, and MDF board.

4. Composites: CNC machines can work with glass and carbon fiber composites, Kevlar, and other composite materials.

5. Ceramics: Machinable ceramics can also be used with CNC machines like porcelain, alumina, zirconia and other materials.

It's important to note that different CNC machines will have specific requirements for the materials that can be used. The feed rate, chip load, and spindle speed will vary depending on the material, so it's essential to understand the material properties and choose the appropriate tools and settings for each job.


What is the difference between CNC milling and CNC turning?

CNC turning and CNC milling are both processes used in CNC machining, but there are some significant differences between the two.

1. Operation: In CNC turning, a stationary cutting tool is used to remove material from a rotating workpiece, whereas in CNC milling, the cutting tools rotate and move across the stationary workpiece.

2. Geometry: CNC turning is more suitable for creating cylindrical shapes such as bolts, nuts, pipes, and shafts. CNC milling is better suited for more complex geometries such as pockets, slots, and complex shapes.

3. Tooling: Turning tools are generally simpler and more robust, while milling tools are more complex and can have more cutting edges.

4. Materials: CNC turning machines are mostly used for turning materials such as round bars, billets, and blocks, while CNC milling machines are used for a wide range of materials such as metals, plastics, wood, and composites.

5. Speed: In general, CNC turning is faster than CNC milling, as the tools are shorter and the process is simpler.

6. Cost: CNC turning is usually less expensive than CNC milling, as the tools are simpler and less expensive.

In summary, CNC turning is best suited for creating simple cylindrical shapes, while CNC milling is better suited for creating more complex geometries. Both processes have their advantages, and the choice between them will depend on the specific requirements of each job.


What is the maximum size of parts that can be machined with CNC machines?

The maximum size of parts that can be machined with CNC machines depends on the size and capacity of the machine being used. CNC machines come in various sizes, and they have different work envelopes that dictate the maximum size of parts they can handle.

Small CNC machines are ideal for small and intricate parts, while larger machines are used for bigger parts. Generally, the maximum size of parts that can be machined on a CNC machine ranges from a few centimeters to several meters.

For example, a small benchtop CNC milling machine may have a work envelope of around 300mm x 300mm x 200mm, while a larger vertical machining center may have a work envelope of 2000mm x 1000mm x 1000mm. In comparison, large gantry-style CNC machines used in the aerospace industry have a work envelope of over 30 meters in length.

It's essential to consider the size and weight of the parts being machined and the capabilities of the CNC machine when selecting a machine for a specific job.


CNC Machining Case Study
CNC machining resources for engineers